Spring 2008

Programming I

 

COURSE:                             CS 2223R

ZAP #:                                    2203

DAY & TIME:                        Online

INSTRUCTOR:                    Cliff Layton

OFFICE LOCATION:          HH 253   (north end of Herrington Hall, upstairs)

OFFICE HOURS:  MT, 7:30 AM to 8:30 AM in HH 253 or the RSU Business and Technology Advising Center; MW, 7:30 to 9:00 AM; TR, 8:30 AM to 10:30 AM in HH 253; F, 7:30 AM to 8:30 AM.

 PHONE #(918) 343-7665               email:   layton@rsu.edu             

 

I.          COURSE PREREQUISITE:          

·        Recommended Class Prerequisite –

o       CS 1213 – Introduction to Computing;

o       a college level programming class; or

o       a high school programming class

·        Knowledge Prerequisite – you should understand the use of the Windows 95, 98, me,  2000, or XP Operating System (what ever you will use) in particular the Windows file and directory system, you should know some algebra (understand algebraic formulas), and you should have done some programming.

II.         COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course will be an introduction to the field of Computer Science and a first course in computer programming.  In this course, the student will learn how to specify the solutions to various problems in algorithmic form and then implement the algorithms in a 3rd generation programming language.  Further course content will include: basic computer literacy, proper structured programming techniques, basic software engineering techniques, introductory classes for object-oriented programming, and basic literacy in data communications.

III.        NEXT COURSE:

cs 2323 – Programming II

IV.       TEXT AND MATERIAL:

Java How to Program Eighth Edition, by Deitel, Prentice Hall, 2010,
ISBN 0-13-605306-8, is the course text book. 
NOTE:  The CD that is packaged with this text book contains
a current version of some software development systems 
needed for the course.

Supplies: 

·       if you want to work at home and in the university lab, you will require a few 3-1/2” HD Floppy Diskettes or 100Meg Zip Disks to which you will store your programs and data files

V.        COURSE GOALS and OBJECTIVES:

One should gain the following upon completion of the course:

  1. The student shall formulate problems in precise, sequential terms.
  2. The student shall formulate problem solutions.
  3. The student shall communicate in terms of the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of Java.
  4. The student shall demonstrate a knowledge of Java i/o, decision structures, methods, classes, and arrays. 
  5. The student shall write, compile, debug, and execute structured and object-oriented programs.

VI.       TEACHING METHODS:

Teaching methods include use of video lectures on CD, reading, lab (problems), exercises, threaded discussion, quizzes, tests, and use of e-mail, phone, and forums for communication.

VII.      ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES AND GRADING POLICIES:

 

Exams will be announced ahead of time.

Please keep track of your grades and your accumulated score as we progress through the semester. The grading scale and basis for student evaluation is stated below:

            Student Evaluation   

Major Quiz, Online Comprehensive to
Point in Course, in Preparation for Mid-Term and Final,
@ 75 pts each      

  150

Mid-Term and Final (Proctored) Exams @ 200 pts each

  400

Labs, 15 @ 30 pts each   

  450

Threaded Discussions, 15 @ 10 pts each 

  150

 

 

Total

1150

           
              Grading Scale:                 

A –  90% and above
B –  80 - 89% 
C –  70 - 79% 
D –  60 - 69%
F –  less than 60%                        

Final Grade: Add up all points obtained and divide by points possible -- compare to above scale. 

VIII.    INFORMATION CONCERNING PROCTORED EXAMS:

Students will take proctored exams.  Each student will choose a proctor that fulfills the qualifications specified in the Proctor Information content item in the Course Introduction.  There is a Proctor Form that is also available as a content item in the Course Introduction.  The student will then fill out the student's portion of the proctor form and have the proctor fill out the proctor's portion.  The instructor will communicate with the proctor concerning exam issues and schedule exams with the proctors.  Students will be informed when they can schedule an exam with the proctor.

IX.       ATTENDANCE POLICIES:

 This course is an online course in which attendance corresponds to contact between student and instructor at least twice per week. Attendance and late arrivals are not directly factored into grading in the course, but it is highly likely that students in the course not having contact with the instructor at least twice per week will generally do well in the course. Also, students MUST participate in Threaded Discussions within the weeks in which they are assigned, in order to receive credit for the assignments, unless exceptions are negotiated

X.        LATE HOMEWORK:

Late assignment turn-in and test make up will not be allowed, subject to negotiation (not encouraged).

XI.       SCHEDULE/ASSIGNMENTS:

Week
Number

 

Text Pages or Other Info. to be Studied

Assignment or Test Due at Week     End

 

Worth
Points

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

Pgs. 1-16, 28, 37-47, CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

 40

2

 

Pgs. 48-58,
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

 40

3

 

Pgs. 84-111,
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

 40

4

 

Pgs. 58-63, 127-34,
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

 40
 

5

 

Pgs. 127-52,
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

 40

6

 

Pgs. 152-61, 186-99
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

 40

7

 

Pgs. 186-99, 207-15,
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion,
Major Quiz

 

 40
75

8

 

Pgs. 186-209,
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

 40

 

 

Chapters Covered in First Eight Wks

Mid-Term Exam

 

200

9

 

Pgs. 87-107 (Review)
Pgs. 240-67,
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion,

 

  40 

10

 

Pgs. 254-67,
Pgs. 295-313
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

  40 

11

 

Pgs. 313-332
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

  40 

12

 

Review Chapter 3,
Study Pgs. 368-407
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

  40 

13

 

Study Pgs. 427-465,
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

  40 

14

 

Study Pgs. 771-93,
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion
 

 

  40 

 

15

 

Study Pgs. 793-800,
CD Content

Labs, Threaded
Discussion

 

  40 

16

 

Review and Final

Comprehensive Final

 

200

 

     TOTAL POINTS                                                                                                                     1150


 

Work in each will be generally due on Monday at 11:00 PM immediately  following the given week.

XII.  PLAGIARISM STATEMENT

Plagiarism is the representation of the words or ideas of another as one’s own, including: direct quotation without both attribution and indication that the material is being directly quoted, e.g. quotation marks; paraphrase without attribution; paraphrase with or without attribution where the wording of the original remains substantially intact and is represented as the author’s own; expression in one’s own words, but without attribution, of ideas, arguments, lines of reasoning, facts, processes, or other products of the intellect where such material is learned from the work of another and is not part of the general fund of common knowledge.

XIII.      STATEMENT FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 

Rogers State University is committed to providing students with disabilities equal access to educational programs and services.  Any student who has a disability that he or she believes will require some form of academic accommodation must inform the professor of such need during or immediately following the first class attended.  Before any educational accommodation can be provided, it is the responsibility of each student to prove eligibility for assistance by registering for services through Student Affairs.

 

Students needing more information about Student Disability Services should contact the office of Student Development at 343-7707.

XIV.     ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT:

Students are expected to follow university policies as put forth in the institution’s Student Code of Responsibilities and Conduct.  In accordance with Title 12 of The Student Code (page 11), instances of alleged academic misconduct will follow the policies and procedures as described in Title 12.  As a general rule, Faculty at Rogers State University have the responsibility of enforcing the academic code. 

The Student Code handbook can be found online at http://www.rsu.edu/resources/studentcode/

XV.  NON-ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT

In order to maintain an effective learning environment, students are expected to fully comply with The Student Code.  Disruptive behavior will not be tolerated.  It is the responsibility of each student to read and become familiar with the policies of The Student Code. 

The Student Code handbook can be found online at http://www.rsu.edu/resources/studentcode/